EUROCALL 2014

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CALL teacher education for tomorrow's world: designing courses for future teaching contexts

Current and imagined practices: language students and teachers making sense of CALL tomorrow

Affordances for (inter)action provided by technology are today abundant and rhizomatic, providing a multilingual “habitat” for people from an early age. (e.g., Pachler, Cook & Bachmair, 2010). Pedagogic practices need to change and teacher education needs to support language students in entering the transforming field with new kinds of professional expertise. Change seems difficult, however, and there are still great differences between schools as for CALL resources available and pedagogic practices (Häkkinen & Hämäläinen, 2012). This paper discusses efforts in facilitating pre-service teachers’ sense-making in relation to the CALL of the future, and includes the perspectives of teachers in the field, using nexus analysis (Scollon & Scollon 2004) and multiple types of data from university courses for language students and teachers with their pupils.

Course design for pre-service secondary teachers: collaboration and reflection in a short CALL course

CALL courses for novice language teachers should cover techno-pedagogical competences and future professional development requirements, but while integrated approaches applied across the curriculum are frequently advocated (Hubbard & Levy, 2006; Kessler, 2006), institutional constraints may favour stand-alone modules. This study investigates pre-service teachers of various L2s in a short CALL course at a French university. It examines the extent to which constructivist principles can inform effective course design, and how teachers can acquire techno-pedagogical skills, filter online content, and work collaboratively in the light of ongoing teaching practice. Data include blogs, wikis, and social media use, as well as reflective comments; analysis focuses on the process and products of this form of CALL teacher education.

Learning to teach for the future: a careful blend of action and reflection

To integrate ever-evolving technologies to foster L2 development, pre-service teachers need to reflect upon CALL's added value while designing and implementing pedagogically relevant activities (Bertin & Narcy-Combes, 2007). Often both "digital immigrants" and novices in pedagogy, unable even to draw on personal language learning experience with technologies, they do learn early in their careers that digital practice is not a mere add-on to pedagogical practice. In this study pre-service EFL teachers participate in action and reflection-based ICT projects - computer supported collaborative writing, and online tutoring - to develop competences likely to be beneficial for their students and themselves. Since no "recipe" can possibly be applied, combining action and reflection may help pre-service teachers be creative, flexible, and open-minded: agents of change for tomorrow’s world.

Continuous Professional Development through Reflective Practice for Experienced TESOL Professionals: the place of off and on-line activities

This paper explores the impact of Reflective Practice (RP) with a group of experienced ELT professionals from a range of international contexts following a structured PhD programme in TESOL. In an RP module teachers revisit their professional reflective practices in a semi-structured learning environment (cf Zwozdiak-Myers, 2012). A corpus of group discussions, reflective blogs and e-portfolios is investigated quantitatively and qualitatively using corpus analysis software and discourse analysis frameworks, providing evidence from experienced teachers on reflective beliefs and practices.

Author(s):

Shona Whyte    
English
Université Nice Sophia Antipolis
France

Shona Whyte is associate professor of English at the University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis in France, where she teaches courses in EFL, SLA, TEFL and learning technologies for language teachers. She has produced e-learning resources for Learning and Teaching Foreign Languages and young EFL learners (http://efl.unice.fr) and her research involves classroom interaction and teacher education in CALL settings.

Leena Kuure    
English Philology
University of Oulu
Finland

Leena Kuure, PhD (Docent), works as a university lecturer in English Philology, University of Oulu, Finland. Her research interests include multimodal and networked literacy practices in technology-rich environments as well as the changing practices of language learning and teaching.

Tuomo Koivisto    
English Philology
University of Oulu
Finland

Tuomo Koivisto, MA, is a doctoral student in English Philology, University of Oulu, Finland. He works as a language teacher and his research focuses on what happens when mobile technologies are brought into the English classroom.

Maritta Riekki    
English Philology
University of Oulu
Finland

Maritta Riekki, MA, is a doctoral student in English Philology, University of Oulu, Finland. Her main interests are developing and improving foreign language learning and teaching practices, on which she has been focusing in her research and work as a language teacher of English, German and French.

Muriel Grosbois    
ESPE Paris
France

Cédric Sarré    
ESPE Paris
France

Fiona Farr    
Centre for Teaching and Learning
University of Limerick
Ireland

Fiona Farr is Dean of Teaching and Learning and Senior Lecturer in TESOL at the University of Limerick. Her professional and research interests include language teacher education, especially teaching practice and reflection, spoken corpora and their applications, discourse analysis and language variety. She has been involved in many applied research projects, most recently the ESRC-funded Corpus Approaches to Social Science (CCAS) co-ordinated by Lancaster University, where she is also Visiting Researcher. She has published in journals such as TESOL Quarterly, Language Awareness, Language Learning, Language Teaching, Classroom Discourse and the Journal of English for Academic Purposes, and has co-edited a special edition of the International Journal of Corpus Linguistics (2011, 16/3) on the theme ‘Applying Corpus Linguistics’. She is author of The Discourse of Teaching Practice Feedback (2011, Routledge) and has co-edited two books: Corpora, Varieties and the Language Classroom (2004, IRAAL), and Language, Learning and Teaching: Irish Research Perspectives (2012, Peter Lang). She also co-edits the Edinburgh University Press book series entitled ‘Edinburgh Textbooks in TESOL’, and is on the editorial board of the journal Classroom Discourse (Routledge). She is currently writing a book for Edinburgh University Press entitled Practice in TESOL, as well as co-editing the Routledge Handbook of Language Learning and Technology.

Elaine Riordan    
Centre for Teaching and Learning
University of Limerick
Ireland

Elaine Riordan is a lecturer in TESOL in the School of Languages, Literature, Culture and Communication at the University of Limerick, Ireland. Here she involved in English language teacher education at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Her research interests include English language teaching and teacher education, the discourse of communities of practice, corpus linguistics and discourse analysis, new technologies for language teaching and learning, and computer-mediated communication.

 

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