EUROCALL 2014

Full Program »

Linking CALL and SLA: Using the IRIS database to locate research instruments

In order to establish an evidence base for future CALL design, it has long been argued that research in our field needs to move away from CALL versus non-CALL comparisons, and more studies need to investigate the differential impact of individual coding elements, that is specific features of a technology which might have an impact on learning (Pederson, 1987). Further, in order to help researchers find possible explanations for the success or failure of CALL interventions and make appropriate adjustments to their design, it is argued that these studies should be conducted within the framework of second language acquisition (SLA) theory and research (ibid.). Despite this, a recent review of research examining the effectiveness of CALL in primary and secondary English as a Foreign Language (EFL) found that CALL vs. non-CALL comparisons are still common and studies focusing on individual coding elements are rare (Macaro et al., 2012). Further, few studies make links with SLA and few measure linguistic outcomes using measures developed in the field of SLA. One reason for this may be difficulty in obtaining the instruments used in SLA research. In this talk, the IRIS database (www.iris-databse.org) is introduced and demonstrated as one way of addressing these problems in relation to future CALL research
IRIS is a digital repository of instruments, materials and stimuli used to elicit data in peer-reviewed research into second and foreign languages. The materials are freely accessible and searchable.. This talk will suggest and demonstrate specific materials held on IRIS that could be re-used to establish closer links between CALL and SLA research. I will discuss how particular materials could help to investigate defined problems in CALL, specifically the roles of interaction, error correction, and task complexity in synchronous dialogue. Delegates will be encouraged to request instruments that are not currently in the database and CALL is currently only of the least well-represented sub-fields in the database, with only two instruments at present. Participants will therefore also encouraged to upload and share their own instruments to the database. With 3500 downloads to date and references to the publications in which the instruments have been used, having materials on IRIS increases the visibility of the original research, in addition to promoting further work with the materials.

Author(s):

Zoe Handley    
Department of Education
University of York
United Kingdom

Dr Zöe Handley is a Lecturer in Language Education in the Department of Education at the University of York. Her current research interests lie in the area of computer-mediated task-based language learning. She has also published research on the use of text-to-speech synthesis in CALL.

Emma Marsden    
Department of Education
University of York
United Kingdom

Emma Marsden's research focuses on classroom learning of foreign languages, with a particular interest in grammar pedagogy and theories of learning. She has also published on research methodology and is director of the IRIS project. Emma used to be a French and Spanish teacher in UK schools and now lectures in applied linguistics at the University of York in the Education department.

 

Powered by OpenConf®
Copyright ©2002-2013 Zakon Group LLC