EUROCALL 2014

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ICT in EFL: the global effect of new technologies in the language classroom.

ICT in EFL: the global effect of new technologies in the language classroom.

Salomi Papadima-Sophocleous, Christina Nicole Giannikas, Elis Kakoulli-Constantinou
Cyprus University of Technology

Research studies conducted globally have shown that ICT can lead to increased student learning and improved teaching methods. ICT’s growth has brought a number of changes to the modern world and their education systems, which have made it impossible to ignore the technological revolution that is occurring around us. Although the revolution in language education is here to stay, language professionals seem reluctant to embrace ICT in their classrooms. Academic research and literature have demonstrated advantages of ICT in language teaching and learning, such as access to an endless world of resources, the promotion of autonomous learning and adding new elements of techniques and methods within the language classroom. Current governmental policies from around the world aim to encourage educators, of all subject areas, to integrate ICT into their practice. Despite the benefits debated, the use of technology in the language classroom is still considered an educational innovation and a complex process. The language teacher is key when it comes to putting ICT investments into good use; therefore, teacher-training policies consist of specific skills, which language educators are to acquire. Without appropriate guidance of national policies and resources of effective programs and/or University modules it is likely that language teachers will continue to sustain such innovations. Nonetheless, research has shown that the outcomes of such programmes have so far proven to be less than satisfactory. The presenters of the proposed paper have recently conducted an exploratory study in the four major cities of Cyprus, where the phenomenon of teachers’ reluctance was uncovered. This intrigued the researchers as the literature suggests that this is a global occurrence. The purpose of this paper is 1) to present the field with an overview of how far the integration of ICT in language education and the development of language teacher education regarding the use of ICT have come and 2) to contribute suggestions on how the situation can improve. The aim of this presentation, and project, is to contribute propositions that will enhance teacher development programmes globally and propel lifelong autonomous learning for language educators, who not only should be exposed to relevant and appropriate guidance in ICT use and implementation, but should be able to progress into autonomous professionals as well. The overview in question entails literature from around the globe, including that of the research project conducted in Cyprus by the presenters of this proposed paper.

Author(s):

Salomi Papadima-Sophocleous    
Language Centre
Cyprus University of Technology
Cyprus

Dr. Salomi Papadima-Sophocleous is an Assistant Professor. Her qualifications include: BA in French and Greek Philology (National and Capodestrian University of Athens, 1978). Postgraduate studies: Postgraduate Diploma in Education, French and Greek Methodology (La Trobe University, 1981); Postgraduate Certificate in TESOL (La Trobe, 1999); Master in Language Curriculum Development and Evaluation – Greek as a second (La Trobe, 1999); Postgraduate Diploma in Computer Assisted Language Learning (Melbourne University, 1999 ); Master in French Literature (University of New England, 2001); Doctorate in Applied Linguistics Development, implementation, and Evaluation of an Online English Placement Test at College Level: A case study (Middlesex University, 2005).

She taught languages (French, Greek and Italian) in various government secondary schools in Melbourne Australia; she was examiner and chief examiner for Greek (Victorian Certificate of Education), committee member for the accreditation and review of language Common Standards Frameworks and language curricula in Melbourne; she taught languages teaching methodology at La Trobe University and Language Teaching Methodology and Computer Assisted Language Learning at RMIT university, both on campus and online (Melbourne) (1981-2001). She taught French, English for Academic Purposes and for Secretarial Studies, Greek, TEFL and CALL at Intercollege and TEFL, CALL, Academic English, and French for Culinary Arts at the University of Nicosia in Cyprus; she coordinated the common Dprof Programme of University of Nicosia and Middlesex University (2001-2010) and acted as advisor for Dprof students (2013).
She was consultant for the establishment of the Cyprus University of Technology Language Centre and coordinator (2007-2009). She has been its director since January 2010. She is a member of the following committees: 1. Republic of Cyprus Ministry of Education and Culture: a. Language Curricula Review; b. Examination Council; c. Greek as a second language government school programme review. 2. CERCLES committee for the development of Quality Control Guidelines for European University Language Centres. She is the teacher trainer for teachers of English and French for the implementation of the Republic of Cyprus Ministry of Education and Culture school New Language Curricula.

Research Interests

She has developed printed and digital learning material for Greek and French. She has also developed NEPTON (New English Placement Test Online). She has established the Centre of Language Interactive and Cooperative Learning (CLILC) at CUT LC; She participated in local, European and International programmes for the evaluation of language programmes, the development of language learning material, the development of language teacher-training programmes, Computer Assisted Language Learning programmes, primary and secondary school student research programmes, and European programmes for the encouragement of teenagers to read literature.

Her current interests include: 1. CALL as an integral part of Languages for Academic Purposes (AP) and Languages for Specific Academic Purposes (SAP); 2. Placement test, formative and summative assessment and testing with the use of new technologies and based on CEFR framework, as an integral part of Languages for (AP) and Languages for (SAP); 3. E-learning; 4. The history of language assessment and testing in Cyprus.

Christina Nicole Giannikas    
Language Centre
Cyprus University of Technology
Cyprus

Christina N. Giannikas is a Research Fellow at the Cyprus University of Technology since March 2013. She is a reviewer for the Canadian Journal of Education and Learning and a committee member of IATEFL YLTSIG.

She completed her BA in English Literature and Linguistics at the University of Hertfordshire. She then continued her postgraduate studies at London Metropolitan University where she acquired an MA in Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) with merit (dissertation with distinction). She then completed a training course for language teachers at the International House of London and received a Certificate in English Language Teaching to Adults (CELTA). At London Metropolitan University she completed her PhD studies in Applied Linguistics, specifically in Early Language Learning within a Greek Regional Context. Recently, she completed a course and received a certificate in Online Teacher Training at the International House (OTTI).

She has taught General and Academic English to adults at the Cambridge School of English and at LSI Hampstead in London. At the ICS primary school, where students from all over the world attended, Christina N. Giannikas taught all subjects in English and was responsible for learners aged 8-10. She was a seminar tutor and guest lecturer for the Applied Linguistics Department at London Metropolitan University and an assistant researcher for the ELLiE project (Early Language Learning in Europe) which was funded by the European Union and the British Council. Christina N. Giannikas was also an academic examiner for Longman & Pearson. In Greece, she worked at a private language school where she was responsible for the teaching staff and the pre-junior classes. She taught English to primary, secondary and University students of all language levels.

Her research interests include communicative language teaching, the use of the mother tongue in language teaching, the study of diglossia from a sociolinguistic perspective, educational policies, early language learning and the use of new technologies in language teaching.

Elis Kakoulli Constantinou    
Language Centre
Cyprus University of Technology
Cyprus

Elis Kakoulli Constantinou holds a BA in English Language and Literature (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece) and an MA in Applied Linguistics (University of Essex, UK). She has taught English to learners of all ages starting from Primary School learners to University students, and she is currently an English Language Instructor at the Cyprus University of Technology. She integrates new technologies in her teaching of English for Academic Purposes, and English for Specific Academic Purposes. Her research focuses on English Language curriculum development, and she is also interested in the latest developments in language teaching methods including the integration of new technologies in language teaching as well as in learning difficulties.

 

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