EUROCALL 2014

Full Program »

Using screen capture technology in L2 writing classrooms: Students' perspectives

A number of innovative digital technologies have recently increased the possibilities for language teachers who desire to work with students in a more dynamic and multimodal manner (Hampel, 2006; Silva, 2012). One such technology has been the growing exploration of the pedagogic applications of screen capture technology (SCT) (Barbier & Spinelli-Jullien, 2009; Geisler & Slattery, 2007). This computer-based tool allows both students and instructors to produce digital records in video form of their onscreen actions which can then be stored, shared and reviewed at a later date. SCT has gained in popularity as a way to engage students in new ways with literacy processes by taking advantage a greater range of meaning-making affordances in digital spaces (aural track + visual track + plus kinetic movement) (Mathisen, 2012; Reinders & Hubbard, 2013).
The paper will focus on case studies (Duff, 2008) of university undergraduate second language writing courses. The project aimed to explore the affordances of SCT for L2 writing development and the promotion of L2 writer autonomy (Ransdell & Barbier, 2002). In these classes SCT was integrated in multiple ways by language instructors to scaffold and enhance traditional writing development tasks. In seeking to better identify those principles that can guide the effective use of this technology in L2 writing classrooms, we will report specifically on the results of an end of term questionnaire administered to two classrooms (one ESL (n = 17) and one FSL (n = 17) group). The questionnaire investigated students’ perception of and reaction to the use of SCT as a pedagogic tool. Questionnaire findings highlight the overall positive response students had in both groups to the integration of SCT in their L2 writing course while also identifying specific uses and factors that affected their perception of the affordances of this technology. Findings namely underscore and contrast the different applications made of this technology in the two contexts. Findings also reveal that there is a relationship between students' perception of the degree of personal investment and engagement with the tool and their assessment of the value of specific SCT-mediated tasks. In particular, the discussion will explore the role of agency in understanding students' adoption and efficient use of this innovative tool. Whereas students expressed at times resistance to the need to acquire specific technical skills required to produce their own SCT videos, they praised the advantages of SCT-mediated tasks which only required a passive/receptive engagement with the tool on their part. Conclusions will focus on implications for future research and pedagogy regarding the application of SCT in classroom contexts to enhance students' awareness of the skills, steps and conventions which are at the heart of successful L2 writing development.

Author(s):

Marie-Josée Hamel    
Official Languages and Bilingualism Institute
University of Ottawa
Canada

Marie-Josée Hamel is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics from the Official Languages and Bilingualism Institute (OLBI) at the University of Ottawa. She is also the Director of its research center, the CCERBAL. She has a PhD in Language Engineering from UMIST and has been involved in CALL research and development since 1994. Her current research interests are pedagogical lexicography and in computer ergonomics in CALL.

Jérémie Séror    
Official Languages and Bilingualism Institute
University of Ottawa
Canada

Chantal Dion    
French department
Carleton University
Canada

 

Powered by OpenConf®
Copyright ©2002-2013 Zakon Group LLC